The Christmas bird – a short story — Robbie’s inspiration – REBLOGGED

The narrow bar of bright light from the gap in the curtains crept across the room. It moved across the face of the sleeping girl and she stirred, the red glow through her eyelids dragging her away from her dreams. It was Christmas morning and […]

The Christmas bird – a short story — Robbie’s inspiration

An Interview With Lia Fairchild on “Home for Christmas” – Short Fiction

By: Shane Lambert

Lia Fairchild.

Is there something wrong with dumping somebody on his or her birthday? What about breaking up on Valentine’s Day?

In answering these questions, I think that most people would feel that there are some times when you do not drop a bomb on a relationship. Whether that’s right or wrong is one matter. But in the name of being considerate, perhaps decency dictates picking an appropriate time for ending a relationship whenever such a consideration is possible.

On that matter, we’re talking about a short story of course — this is a short-story website. I had a back and forth with fellow Indy-writer Lia Fairchild this week, therein discussing her eBook “Home for Christmas.” Described as a “holiday romance short” the story tells of two people who have “intertwined” fates, perhaps reminding literary fans out there of the famous “star-crossed lovers” Romeo and Juliet. One situation in the novel is the question of Christmas-time relationship-status changes. Would you drop the bomb on Christmas Day?

Fairchild’s publication features Ali and Stephen, two people in need of “a real Christmas miracle,” a miracle that will have to be on the romantic side. My back-and-forth with the other is below.

Follow this link to the download page at BookFunnel.

Me, Shane Lambert: “Can we start with a technicality? The line between a short story and a novella is a blurry one. Amazon says your ‘Home for Christmas’ is 61 pages in length and it’s also in the 90-minute category for reading time. We are a short-website here at short-stories-online.com, would you call “Home for Christmas” a short story or novella? Did you start with a short story in mind but then found yourself wanting to carry on? Or did you just write it and stop when you felt it was complete?”

Lia Fairchild: “I just had an idea for a story and then started writing. But I knew it wouldn’t be a full-lengthed book. I actually still consider it a short story. Most authors I’ve talked to consider a novella to be at least 20,000 words.”

Me, Shane Lambert: “Okay. While avoiding plot spoilers, the Amazon reviews — which are generally positive — make it clear that “Home for Christmas” deals with relationships. When it comes to ending relationships, does your book explore this often difficult thing to do with a reference to the Christmas-time setting? It seems there would be a contrast between the joy of the season and the grief of loving in vain, of being rejected. Does this come up?”

Lia Fairchild: “Yes, there are various relationships starting and stopping for different reasons. Most of this I wouldn’t want to give specifics on as they are key surprises in the story. I can say that one of my characters grapples with ending a relationship during the holidays because it’s that much harder for both the person initiating and the person who doesn’t want to leave the relationship. However, it was less about rejection and more about facing the holidays alone, dealing with the questions from family.”

Me, Shane Lambert: “On the marketing side, as an author writing a holiday romance, do you face any challenges of keeping the momentum going when it comes to sustaining a constant readership? No one wants Hallowe’en stuff in November, they say, — I’m wondering if anyone wants a Christmas-time setting in their fiction reading after Christmas is over.”

Lia Fairchild: “It seems like the kind of eBook that would be popular at Christmas time but not so popular again after that and then not popular for most of the year. That’s true. I wasn’t worried about it as the story originated for a group anthology project and I now I typically just promote it during November and December.”

Me, Shane Lambert: “From reading the preview, it looks like you employ a third-person narrator? Is it omniscient as well? Which of your characters’ heads do you reveal the most about in the narration?”

Lia Fairchild: “Third person, yes. Omniscient, no. It’s a dual point-of-view swapping between a male and female character. I don’t like to head hop as a writer and I don’t like it as an editor either.”

Me, Shane Lambert: “Lastly, I know you are based in Southern California. Where is ‘Home for Christmas’ set?”

Lia Fairchild: “Oddly enough, I don’t remember. I wrote the story years ago and just wanted a wintery Christmas feel. I do have a few books set in Southern California, though.”

Me, Shane Lambert: “Well, I’ll assume it’s set where I live, here in the Canadian Rockies where we do get the wintery setting. Thank you for your time and I hope you continue to enjoy success with your writing career.”